About

Arrival

Arrival

In 1987, at 16, between a photojournalistic tour of war-torn Nicaragua and an internship at world-renowned photojournalist agency Magnum Photos, Shannon had begun to acquire his basis in media. He was born in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, and grew up in New York City for eight years before attending Syracuse University to study photojournalism at the Newhouse School of Public Communications. After several years traveling and a series of entertaining adventures, he returned to New York, and emerged on Wall Street, where he worked for J.P. Morgan’s advertising department from 1999 to 2000 while gathering experience working in the independent film industry.

It was this experience that spurred him to write, direct and produce a short film, “Burnout,” which became one of only 15 films selected from 300 to be screened at the Cannes Film Market by the New York International Independent Film and Video Festival. He also produced a documentary about artist J. S. G. Boggs, profiled in The New Yorker magazine, who drew interest to his work by drawing his own unique versions of currency and spending them based on their value as artwork.

Shannon arrived in China in January 2001 to pursue new opportunities, and has since photographed and produced for Olay (Procter & Gamble through Edelman Public Relations), IBM (producing and shooting a 5-day, $19,000 shoot for Ogilvy & Mather Asia-Pacific, Sydney, Australia), Swarovski London, Asimco Technologies (a $300 million initial investment China-based auto parts manufacturer), Institutional Investor, MIT Tech Review Magazine (cover), Starbucks, Elle, Cosmopolitan, Shell Oil, and numerous local clients. He is also contracted by Getty Images for photo assignments (www.gettyimages.com). He has also produced documentaries and corporate videos for clients ranging from major international brands like Nestlé to local companies, both educational and commercial. His first creative exercise in China was to write, produce, direct and edit an 8-minute short called “Signal Trace,” shot entirely with non-professional, non-English speaking Chinese actors. He later shot and directed a documentary series about China “after dark.” His original Photoshop(TM) design work for Coca Cola for the 2008 Olympics was also well-received.

Having relocated to Southeast Asia, he is currently in negotiations with his fourth screenplay, inspired by a true story detailing China and America’s first law enforcement cooperation which took down the world’s largest heroin ring in 2003.

Comments
  1. Perdita says:

    I am wondering if there is a market the way I see things through my camera.
    Please be so kind and read my BIO and I be glad to send some of my art.
    MY STORY.
    The picture of my soul.
    I grew up in Germany. At the tender age of 12, a family member gave me an extraordinary gift. Later in my life, that gift would have much meaning and would passionately arouse me adult life. I did not quite at the time understand the camera and the meaning behind it, but I enjoyed looking though it. A seed was planted, and now it has blossomed into me using my creativity as many gift. My passion for photography grew and became my sanctuary. It is my connection to my inner self and all things around me. It is my way of entering the world through the shutter curtain and flying high. When I shoot, I do not shoot with an ordinary mind or with an ordinary eye. My images are my friends who have been sought out and honored. Photography truly connects me to my past and brings me to my future. With photography, I have made many marvelous discoveries in my own life. I honor my camera because it shelters me. I embrace the changes and opportunities that my camera will invite into my life.

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